2040 Transportation Master Plan: Our Kelowna as We Move

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Engagement conclusion can be found at the bottom of this page.

Kelowna’s draft 2040 Transportation Master Plan (TMP) sets the direction for a vibrant city where people and places are conveniently connected by diverse transportation options. It is a long-term plan for transportation improvements that will help keep Kelowna moving, now and into the future.

The draft 2040 TMP recognizes that Kelowna is growing, our climate is changing, and our transportation needs are evolving. It will help us reduce the growth of carbon emissions (that contribute to extreme heat, fires, and floods), accommodate more trips while reducing our car-dependence, and maintain and protect the Kelowna lifestyle we all value.

The plan has set targets for 2040 that we can all work together to achieve. These include:

  • doubling transit ridership,
  • quadrupling the number of trips made by bicycle, and
  • reducing the average distance each person drives by 20 per cent.

These targets are ambitious, yet achievable with the actions proposed in the plan.


How to get involved - closed

The draft 2040 Transportation Master Plan is now live and we want to hear from you!



Explore this interactive Story Map to learn about the draft 2040 TMP, its goals, how residents have had a say during the multi-year engagement, and the plan recommendations. You can also review the draft 2040 TMP Fact Sheet.




For a more in depth look, review the complete draft 2040 Transportation Master Plan and related background documents in the Document Library.



Your feedback is meaningful and will be used to refine the draft 2040 TMP before it is finalized. Complete the questionnaire below before Oct. 24, or sign-up for a focus group to tell us what you think!

By completing the questionnaire, you can enter to win a $100 gift card to The Local Gift Card.


Conclusion 

The final engagement report can be found in the documents section on the right of this page titled "2040 TMP Engagement Report - 2021". The report outlines key themes, survey responses, and more. 

Through this final phase of public engagement, it remains clear that the residents are interested and invested in the way we move around. Residents want to see us work to make sure that it’s safe and easy for people of all ages, incomes and abilities to get to where they need to go. 

As we work to deliver on the TMP goals, we will bring our Imagine Kelowna vision to life taking action on climate change and reducing our carbon emissions, building healthy neighbourhoods, reducing car dependency, embracing diverse transportation options, and making equitable investments in our city’s transportation future. In doing so, Kelowna will be a more connected community. 

Engagement conclusion can be found at the bottom of this page.

Kelowna’s draft 2040 Transportation Master Plan (TMP) sets the direction for a vibrant city where people and places are conveniently connected by diverse transportation options. It is a long-term plan for transportation improvements that will help keep Kelowna moving, now and into the future.

The draft 2040 TMP recognizes that Kelowna is growing, our climate is changing, and our transportation needs are evolving. It will help us reduce the growth of carbon emissions (that contribute to extreme heat, fires, and floods), accommodate more trips while reducing our car-dependence, and maintain and protect the Kelowna lifestyle we all value.

The plan has set targets for 2040 that we can all work together to achieve. These include:

  • doubling transit ridership,
  • quadrupling the number of trips made by bicycle, and
  • reducing the average distance each person drives by 20 per cent.

These targets are ambitious, yet achievable with the actions proposed in the plan.


How to get involved - closed

The draft 2040 Transportation Master Plan is now live and we want to hear from you!



Explore this interactive Story Map to learn about the draft 2040 TMP, its goals, how residents have had a say during the multi-year engagement, and the plan recommendations. You can also review the draft 2040 TMP Fact Sheet.




For a more in depth look, review the complete draft 2040 Transportation Master Plan and related background documents in the Document Library.



Your feedback is meaningful and will be used to refine the draft 2040 TMP before it is finalized. Complete the questionnaire below before Oct. 24, or sign-up for a focus group to tell us what you think!

By completing the questionnaire, you can enter to win a $100 gift card to The Local Gift Card.


Conclusion 

The final engagement report can be found in the documents section on the right of this page titled "2040 TMP Engagement Report - 2021". The report outlines key themes, survey responses, and more. 

Through this final phase of public engagement, it remains clear that the residents are interested and invested in the way we move around. Residents want to see us work to make sure that it’s safe and easy for people of all ages, incomes and abilities to get to where they need to go. 

As we work to deliver on the TMP goals, we will bring our Imagine Kelowna vision to life taking action on climate change and reducing our carbon emissions, building healthy neighbourhoods, reducing car dependency, embracing diverse transportation options, and making equitable investments in our city’s transportation future. In doing so, Kelowna will be a more connected community. 

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.


Do you have a question about the Draft 2040 Transportation Master Plan? Ask it here and we'll get you an answer as soon as possible. 

Please note that we are only able to respond during regular City operating hours: 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Monday to Friday (excluding holidays.)



  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    How can a transportation plan not address reducing traffic noise, and in particular doing something about the year-over-year increase in modified, illegally loud vehicles? Indeed, how can a transportation plan not contain the word "noise", not even once?

    Jeff asked 3 months ago

    Hello, thanks for your question. The Transportation Master Plan (TMP) is intended to be comprehensive, but it can't get into all of the details. Noise from vehicles is regulated by the City's Traffic Bylaw, Good Neighbour Bylaw (p.8), and the Provincial Motor Vehicle Act Regulations.

    Although they do not specifically mention noise, the TMP contains several policies which speak to reducing the impact of traffic on nearby residents' quality of life by controlling speeding (e.g. Policy 5.1, p.50) or considering effects on residents before widening roads (e.g. Policy 1.17, p.45).

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    Why is there still a need for 2 x 24-hour truck routes (along Clement and Weddell and then up Ellis) into the North End now that the Mill is gone? It would seem to me that at least one of these truck routes can be made day time only (maybe Weddell), and the upper portion of truck route on Ellis ending at the defunct Mill can be eliminated. Do you concur?

    skiwidow asked 4 months ago

    Hello - thanks for your question. The closure of the Tolko mill site does raise questions for future truck routes in the North End. If you haven't already seen it, take a look at the North End Neighbourhood Plan, which is just getting underway. This plan will set the vision for the North End, including the current industrial lands, which will inform decisions about truck routes in the area.

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    Do you have any plans to add a Frequent Transit route along K.L.O. Road and Benvoulin Road from South Pandosy to Orchard Park? It seems like a major roadway and an intuitive way to connect South Pandosy (and the Mission) with Midtown and Rutland. Currently the only similar route is the #4 which is seasonal and barely runs even when it's in season.

    d.edmeades asked over 2 years ago

    Thanks for the question. The TMP does include a recommendation to gradually build up Route #4 to an all-day frequent route in order to link Pandosy, Midtown, and UBC Okanagan as you mentioned. The timing of service increases to Route #4 will be determined by available resources and competing demands from other routes in the future.

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    Why is it that we have a MAJOR connective highway(97) running through virtually all sectors but we can NOT seem to create smooth flow of traffic; some of which merges in and out regularly? The lights are random and not synchronized and left turning signals are still at a minimum. Many folks at some point in their commute have to rely on a section of the highway for completing their trip. Certain times of day i can most definitely bike faster than a vehicle from one end of Kelowna to the other! Fixing the flow of the light patterns on the highway would be massive!

    JoyMarie asked 4 months ago

    Hello - thanks for your question. Highway 97 is controlled by the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, meaning that the City does not set the timing of signals. However, generally speaking, the Ministry does coordinate the signals on Harvey to maximize the flow of east-west traffic on the highway. It is also worth noting that while left-turn arrows are sometimes necessary, they often reduce the flow of vehicles heading straight through.

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    Why does the city make pedestrians beg to cross almost every intersection with a signal? To create equity traffic should not have more rights than people. Remove the beg buttons so that lights are always safe for walking without having to wait for 1-3 minutes for a whole light cycle.

    infernovideo asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for the question. At the start of the pandemic, we disabled the push buttons at many intersections in our Urban Centres and instead had the walk signal come up every cycle. This makes sense in places where there are lots of people walking. In places where fewer people are walking, having a walk signal every cycle would cause a lot of unnecessary delays for people driving. As we review how our traffic signals work in the future, we will be looking for places to make signals more 'responsive' or shortening the time between pushing the button and the walk signal coming up.

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    Based on the results of the 'Alternative Approval Process' with respect to the South Perimeter Road advancement project, What is the extend of the project, timing and realignment of existing roads? One of the original plans showed the road being extended to Bedford Road, with realignment of Saucier Road through that section. Without the realignment of Saucier Road at Bedford Road there is a concern of safety. With the pending increase in traffic volume, there will be issues with the intersection due to limited sightline for traffic leaving Saucier. Also the road grade of Saucier approaching Bedford would become an issue during winter conditions. With the pending increase in traffic, the extension of the widening of Benvoulin Road from KLO to Casorso would eminently be required to alleviate traffic congestion at the round-a-bouts on Casorso.

    moi asked almost 4 years ago

    Hello - work on construction of South Perimeter Road began in March 2021. A number of improvements were already completed at Stewart and Saucier roads and additional improvements to Bedford and DeHart may be necessary once South Perimeter Road is operational.

    View more information, including the schedule and the alignment at kelowna.ca/cityprojects.

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    Do you know if the city has any plans to continue the Abbott Street Recreation Corridor southward? Unfortunately it ends abruptly at the hospital at the intersection of Rose Ave. It funnels it's many southbound users (including on wheelchairs) directly onto the street. There are no sidewalks. There's often vehicles parked on the gravel shoulders and quite a lot of traffic. A dangerous, poorly designed part of what is otherwise a great Kelowna feature.

    Al J2 asked over 3 years ago

    Thank you for your question. Abbott Street is one of Kelowna's busiest bicycling and pedestrian routes and funding for permanent infrastructure to extend the Abbott corridor is planned in the 10-year Capital Plan for the year 2030 or later, pending budget availability. 

    Public feedback on options to complete the corridor sooner were sought earlier this year. Check out the Quick-build Abbott Active Transportation Corridor project page for updates on the engagement outcomes and the proposed design. 


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    Why don’t we have bus service to magic estates? 26 years of paying taxes and asking for bus service. Why are we not included? The mayor says we need to take transit....... then provide it.

    Cj asked about 2 years ago

    One of the key challenges in transit planning is how best to allocate resources between routes in the central parts of the community (the Transit Core area), which account for roughly 90% of transit use in Kelowna, and expanding service to new outlying areas as the city grows (Transit Coverage areas). The challenge is that transit service to places like Magic Estates can easily be 3 or 4 times as expensive to provide per rider than transit service to areas with more people and jobs. 

    Currently we’re focused on responding to significant ridership growth on major routes that service the Transit Core; demand we’re challenged to meet with current resources. As resources become available, priority is placed on ensuring that existing routes in the transit system are functioning effectively and are able to meet demand ahead of expanding services to new areas.

    Coverage areas that are not served today may be considered for new service as resources permit, and only when the combined population and employment is deemed sufficient to generate a level of ridership that ensures services are able to meet minimum performance standards. When considering new Coverage services, prospective new service areas would then compete with others where transit may also be in demand. While a small pocket of residential density in the area of Magic Estates is close to meeting minimum population levels to support transit, population density must be realized across a contiguous area where a route would operate. As development continues at sites along Clifton Road this may improve the viability of a future transit route to that area.


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    when is the city of kelowna going to build a bus shelter /seat on Springfield and Gordon south bound been needing on for years or 2 bus stops shelters out side the kelowna food bank its a blasted long way between stops to walk with full bags not every one is RICH and can afored a car you try 4-7 bags of food and lug them to the bus stops in 30c weather or winter with snow and ice

    Davidh asked about 2 years ago

    In regards to the Gordon/Springfield bus shelter suggestion, in 2015 when the stop was first placed, the City was unsuccessful in its attempt to acquire land from the adjacent property to provide space to install a shelter. Until such time that the property develops or the owner wishes to sell a small portion of land, a shelter cannot be provided at this location.

    In regards to bus stops near the foodbank on Enterprise Way, bus stops are placed at 300-400 meter intervals along major routes depending on factors such as land use and proximity to safe, controlled pedestrian crossings. While there are no bus stops directly adjacent to the Foodbank, there are stops within 300 meters of the facility located on Enterprise Way at Dilworth Drive and on Enterprise at Leckie Road. While we understand that walking this distance while carrying heavy bags can be challenging, unfortunately, a closer bus stop cannot be safely provided given the lack of controlled crossing and challenging road geometry in the area.


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    The problem of the Gordon Drive commute from the upper Mission in the morning MUST BE ADDRESSED. The volume of traffic leaving the upper Missionin the morning is horrendous. Most days I have to wait for some one to let me into the flow of traffic onto Gordon and it takes 10-15 minutes to crawl from Paret Rd to OKM high school. Yet, more homes are being built “up top” and with the middle school being built, more parents will be driving up the hill to drop off their kids only to drive back down. Pedestrian activated lights at McClure and Raymer add to problem as well as vehicles and school buses trying to make a left hand turn out of the high school. Kelowna is becoming too “Vancouverish” with its driving mentality and the frustration is mounting.

    RA asked about 3 years ago

    Thank you for your comment. Staff reviewed traffic delays on Gordon Drive last spring. A summary of findings can be found here: https://bit.ly/2PLBwfH. While there is congestion in the morning around bell time, both Gordon and Lakeshore are delay-free over 23 hours per day. The crosswalks at McClure and Raymer are in place to protect students crossing the street.