Our Kelowna as we grow

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

By 2040, we can expect another 45,000 residents to call Kelowna home. We’re in the final phase of updating our Official Community Plan (OCP), the document that will guide how we grow over the next 20 years.

Following a widespread and multi-year engagement process, the draft 2040 OCP was presented to the public for input from January-March.

Thank you for your participation!

The draft was shaped by a series of engagement opportunities, beginning with the development of our community vision, Imagine Kelowna. This final phase of OCP engagement built on dialogue with the public to date and explored a range of topics specific to how our community grows. We asked residents to share their feedback and help bring our community's vision of a vibrant, sustainable and inclusive Kelowna to life.

Ways the public got involved


Survey

January 26-March 31, 2021.



Virtual focus groups

The OCP team presented three sessions on: climate action and environmental protection, Urban Centres and residential infill, agricultural lands and suburban neighbourhoods. Participants had the opportunity to ask questions and share their thoughts on a number of key directions related to these themes. The final session concluded on March 11, 2021.



Discussion forums

The discussion forum allowed participants to share detailed feedback and see what other members of the community had to say.



Interactive display

From March 17-March 31, 2021, visitors at City Hall could learn more about the draft 2040 OCP and leave comments in person.


Public feedback – along with technical data, stakeholder input, and existing policies – are helping to further refine the draft 2040 OCP. The plan is in the process of being finalized and is expected to be presented to Council for endorsement later in 2021.

Have a question? Get in touch or check out the FAQs.

By 2040, we can expect another 45,000 residents to call Kelowna home. We’re in the final phase of updating our Official Community Plan (OCP), the document that will guide how we grow over the next 20 years.

Following a widespread and multi-year engagement process, the draft 2040 OCP was presented to the public for input from January-March.

Thank you for your participation!

The draft was shaped by a series of engagement opportunities, beginning with the development of our community vision, Imagine Kelowna. This final phase of OCP engagement built on dialogue with the public to date and explored a range of topics specific to how our community grows. We asked residents to share their feedback and help bring our community's vision of a vibrant, sustainable and inclusive Kelowna to life.

Ways the public got involved


Survey

January 26-March 31, 2021.



Virtual focus groups

The OCP team presented three sessions on: climate action and environmental protection, Urban Centres and residential infill, agricultural lands and suburban neighbourhoods. Participants had the opportunity to ask questions and share their thoughts on a number of key directions related to these themes. The final session concluded on March 11, 2021.



Discussion forums

The discussion forum allowed participants to share detailed feedback and see what other members of the community had to say.



Interactive display

From March 17-March 31, 2021, visitors at City Hall could learn more about the draft 2040 OCP and leave comments in person.


Public feedback – along with technical data, stakeholder input, and existing policies – are helping to further refine the draft 2040 OCP. The plan is in the process of being finalized and is expected to be presented to Council for endorsement later in 2021.

Have a question? Get in touch or check out the FAQs.

Question & Answer

Have a question about the 2040 OCP? Ask us here. We will get back to you as soon as possible. 

loader image
Didn't receive confirmation?
Seems like you are already registered, please provide the password. Forgot your password? Create a new one now.
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    What are your plans to fix the fact that traffic runs through the downtown core?

    Chris Dumigan asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for the question. The draft Transportation Master Plan (TMP) and the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) provide much more detail on the planned transportation improvements over the next 20 years. Identified projects include, but are not limited to:

    • Extension of Clement Avenue from Spall Road to McCurdy Road, providing a new east-west connection, reducing the growth of traffic congestion on Highway 97
    • Dedicated transit lanes on Highway 97, allowing for faster more reliable transit servicing, increasing the people moving capacity of Highway 97
    • Road and intersection improvements near UBCO and the Airport as part of the Okanagan Gateway project.


    Details on the Regional Transportation Plan can be found here: https://www.smarttrips.ca/sites/files/6/docs/related/kelowna_regionaltransportationplan_122120.pdf

    Details on Kelowna's Transportation Master Plan can be found here:

    https://www.kelowna.ca/our-community/planning-projects/transportation-master-plan

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    How do these guidelines get used by city in their approval process, if they are not clear mandates, bylaws, etc.?

    2040OCP asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for the question. The Local Government Act gives municipalities the ability to create Development Permit Areas (DPAs) which are incorporated into OCPs and form part of the OCP's bylaw, which is how they are enforced. The OCP describes the special objectives and conditions that justify the creation of the DPA and what is required to meet those objectives. For example, a DPA might be created to establish form and character guidelines for new development, or to protect the natural environment, and sets out the guidelines that must be met for that Development Permit to be issued.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Any direction the Central Mobile Home Park which is outside the Pandosy Urban Centre?

    2040OCP asked 7 months ago

    Great question. The draft OCP signals the site as "Core Area - Neighbourhood" which allows for single detached and low density multi-family development like four-plexes and rowhousing. However, Policy 5.3.4 speaks to a more comprehensive neighbourhood planning process being required prior to redevelopment of the site to address issues like housing mix, parks and street layout and connectivity. The need for this plan is also included in the Making the Work chapter alongside other neighbourhood plans that will follow the OCP.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Why has Planning backed away from the proposed concept of "view corridors" between new highrises?

    2040OCP asked 7 months ago

    Thanks for the question. The location of towers, their spacing and staggering is addressed in Chapter 19: Form and Character Design Guidelines. With regard to building heights in general, Staff will provide Council with a clear summary of all community feedback. Building height is a clear concern and will be discussed in the summary. Recommendations for further review will come from that. Refinements to items like height maps will take place through the early summer.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    What population are YOU talking about as 'complete'? Service centers are not economically feasible without some sort of critical mass. How many residents are already in these neighborhoods, I don't see that listed anywhere in the OCP 2040 document, can we get that added in please?

    2040OCP asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for the question! We don't have strict density targets for our suburban neighbourhoods to consider the viability of pre-determined commercial centres. Instead, we use commercial demand studies at the detailed level to ensure that any proposed commercial development is scaled appropriately to the neighbourhood. Otherwise, you risk getting caught in a vicious cycle where you need to continue to approve more suburban development to feed a commercial centre that wasn't planned properly to begin with.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    What is being done to support hydrogen fuel cell vehicle rollout in Kelowna.

    Eric asked 6 months ago

    Great question. The City will continue to monitor the growth in hydrogen vehicles as an emerging technology, but there are very few of these vehicles in Kelowna today. Hydrogen vehicles do show promise for growth, but the City's emphasis will be on developing our Electric Vehicle Strategy first, as there is significantly more uptake on EVs. Future planning for hydrogen vehicles may take place as the market starts to grow.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    What do the engineers say about trunk services (water, sewer, wastewater) to these suburbs; is there enough capacity to support infill development toward complete communities? Or will we need to build more? And if we need to build more, will that mean increases to DCC rates and/or levy?

    2040OCP asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for the question. No major new infrastructure has been identified to meet the small scale of suburban infill anticipated in the draft 2040 OCP.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    What about services like fire halls for the increased population and buidlings and urgent care/ clinical services - would medical services be encouraged in these 'complete' suburban neighbourhoods?

    2040OCP asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for the question! All new suburban development needs to be reviewed by the Fire Department and any new infrastructure would have to be identified in the OCP or the appropriate Area Structure Plan (ASP). For small-scale out-patient medical services, they would be supported in Village Centres and neighbourhood commercial nodes.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Can taxes be increased for people living in those neighbourhoods in light of the fact it is a deficit to infrastructure debt to complete these areas?

    2040OCP asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for the question. Yes, there are some financial tools available, but the most effective method is just not building suburbs the same way we did 40 years ago.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    How do those suburban neighbourhoods use infrastructure efficiently when they are spread out as far apart as they are?

    2040OCP asked 6 months ago

    Great question. Low-density suburban neighbourhoods struggle to make efficient use of infrastructure. That is one of the reasons the OCP is providing clear direction to stop planning new ones. For those that are under development, supporting small nodes of commercial services that are appropriately scaled can help make suburban neighbourhoods a little more complete.