Casorso Active Transportation Corridor

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The City sought feedback on concepts for a new active transportation corridor (ATC) between Raymer Avenue and K.L.O. Road.

This new corridor (Casorso 4 ATC) will close gaps in the existing network by extending the Ethel Street ATC south, linking downtown and Capri-Landmark to South Pandosy. It will also offer bicyclists and pedestrians better access to major destinations like Okanagan College.

We asked

Which route would you prefer between Raymer Avenue to K.L.O. Road?

Option 1: ATC runs down the length of the laneway between Raymer and K.L.O Road Option 2: ATC runs halfway down the lane, crosses over Fascieux Creek, and continues on the west side of the Okanagan College campus

Project Update

After reviewing technical considerations and public comments, and engaging with stakeholders, the Casorso 4 ATC project will move ahead with Option 1. This option is less costly and will maintain parking on the Okanagan College campus. Detailed design is currently underway.

Key features of the corridor include:

  • Extension of the protected bike lanes from Ethel Street along Raymer Avenue
  • A north-south bike route along the laneway west of the wastewater treatment plant between Raymer Avenue and K.L.O. Road
  • Renewal of existing infrastructure, such as repaving the laneway
  • New infrastructure, including:
    1. concrete curb on Raymer to separate bicyclists from motor vehicles
    2. new markings and signage on both Raymer and the laneway
    3. new lighting in the laneway
    4. a two-way bike path along K.L.O. Road connecting from the south end of the laneway to the Casorso Road intersection crossing
  • Tree consideration along K.LO. Road in coordination with Okanagan College

Project Background

A key objective identified in the 2016 Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan (PBMP) and Transportation Master Plan (in development) is to ensure that walking and cycling are safe, convenient, and practical modes of travel. Active transportation corridors increase the number of people walking and cycling by providing comfortable and safe connections between key destinations for cyclists of all ages and abilities.

The Casorso 4 ATC project (Raymer-K.L.O.) is proposed for construction in 2021. Two future segments of the Casorso 3 ATC project (K.L.O.-Barrera) extending south, are currently in the preliminary design stage. There will be an opportunity for public input on the Casorso 3 ATC in 2021.

The City sought feedback on concepts for a new active transportation corridor (ATC) between Raymer Avenue and K.L.O. Road.

This new corridor (Casorso 4 ATC) will close gaps in the existing network by extending the Ethel Street ATC south, linking downtown and Capri-Landmark to South Pandosy. It will also offer bicyclists and pedestrians better access to major destinations like Okanagan College.

We asked

Which route would you prefer between Raymer Avenue to K.L.O. Road?

Option 1: ATC runs down the length of the laneway between Raymer and K.L.O Road Option 2: ATC runs halfway down the lane, crosses over Fascieux Creek, and continues on the west side of the Okanagan College campus

Project Update

After reviewing technical considerations and public comments, and engaging with stakeholders, the Casorso 4 ATC project will move ahead with Option 1. This option is less costly and will maintain parking on the Okanagan College campus. Detailed design is currently underway.

Key features of the corridor include:

  • Extension of the protected bike lanes from Ethel Street along Raymer Avenue
  • A north-south bike route along the laneway west of the wastewater treatment plant between Raymer Avenue and K.L.O. Road
  • Renewal of existing infrastructure, such as repaving the laneway
  • New infrastructure, including:
    1. concrete curb on Raymer to separate bicyclists from motor vehicles
    2. new markings and signage on both Raymer and the laneway
    3. new lighting in the laneway
    4. a two-way bike path along K.L.O. Road connecting from the south end of the laneway to the Casorso Road intersection crossing
  • Tree consideration along K.LO. Road in coordination with Okanagan College

Project Background

A key objective identified in the 2016 Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan (PBMP) and Transportation Master Plan (in development) is to ensure that walking and cycling are safe, convenient, and practical modes of travel. Active transportation corridors increase the number of people walking and cycling by providing comfortable and safe connections between key destinations for cyclists of all ages and abilities.

The Casorso 4 ATC project (Raymer-K.L.O.) is proposed for construction in 2021. Two future segments of the Casorso 3 ATC project (K.L.O.-Barrera) extending south, are currently in the preliminary design stage. There will be an opportunity for public input on the Casorso 3 ATC in 2021.

  • Definitions

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    Active Transportation Corridors (ATCs) are safe and convenient routes for walking, biking, and other active modes. They include a variety of facility types, including protected bike lanes, multi-use pathways, and shared streets.


    Protected bike lanes are spaces for people biking which are physically separated from vehicles and pedestrians by vertical and horizontal elements.



    Two-way protected bike lanes are physically separated bike lanes that allow bicycle movement in both directions on one side of the road.



    Multi-use pathways are shared facilities for people walking and biking.



    Shared Spaces are streets or laneways designed to be shared by people walking, biking, and driving slowly, with no physical separation of modes.


  • Design Options 1& 2

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    Option 1 - Laneway for the full length to K.L.O. Road

    The Active Transportation Corridor runs the length of the laneway from Raymer Avenue to K.L.O. Road, operating as a shared space. New lighting, signage and markings will be added to enhance the space and guide users.



    Benefits

    • Uses the existing laneway
    • Laneway will be repaved
    • No bridge required over Fascieux Creek

    Tradeoffs

    • Similar to today, pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles would share the laneway but with improvements, such as new lighting, signage and markings
    • Vehicles will continue to turn on and off the laneway to access adjacent properties
    • Fascieux Creek adjacent to K.L.O. Road forms a pathway pinch point, but this could be widened at a cost
    • At K.L.O. Road, vehicle movements would be restricted to southbound only (no entry from K.L.O.) to prevent conflict between motor vehicles turning from K.L.O. Road and people walking and biking to and from the laneway

    Option 2 - Okanagan College

    The Active Transportation Corridor runs down the north half of the lane from Raymer Avenue, reaching a new bridge across Fascieux Creek, to be constructed as part of the project. Users cross the bridge at the north-west corner of the Okanagan College Campus (OC), continue along the western edge of the OC parking lot, and on to K.L.O. Road.


    Benefits

    • Better connects to OC's future pedestrian and bicycle pathway network
    • Limits interactions between vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists to the north half of the lane
    • Better visibility and comfort for pathway users within the college campus
    • Maintains two-way vehicle traffic along the laneway, including at K.L.O.

    Trade-offs

    • Loss of parking on campus (32 stalls) and student housing (22 stalls)
    • Cost of new bridge structure and compensation for use of OC lands
    • Similar to today, pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles would share the north half of the laneway but with improvements such as new lighting, signage, and markings

    Option Comparison


  • Raymer Avenue proposed approach

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    This two-way protected bike lane extends the Ethel Street ATC along the south side of Raymer, then turns south down the laneway running along the west side of the wastewater treatment facility.

    For users, this means:

    • The Casorso and Ethel ATCs will be linked via Raymer Avenue.
    • A two-way protected bike lane along the south side of Raymer will be used by Casorso and Ethel ATC users travelling in both directions.
    • For cyclists riding westbound along Raymer, the westbound bike lane will remain as is.
    • Cyclists riding eastbound on Raymer will merge into the protected bike lane until Ethel and then to continue east they will transition into the existing bike lane.


    Benefits

    • Provides separation between pedestrians, bicyclists and vehicles.
    • Fits within the existing roadway and does not require widening toward the adjacent creek.

    Trade-offs

    • On-street parking on the south side of Raymer between Ethel St. and the laneway will be removed due to insufficient road width.