Quick-build Abbott Active Transportation Corridor

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How to participate & stay informed

The online survey open from May 19 to June 6, 2021, has now closed. Thank you to the more than 1,000 people who shared their feedback.

Ask a question in the Q&A section

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Project background

Abbott Street is one of Kelowna's busiest bicycling and pedestrian routes.

We're planning upgrades to create a safer and more comfortable bicycling route for people of all ages and abilities.

The existing Abbott Street Active Transportation Corridor (ATC) was designed and constructed in 2012.

Permanent construction of the rest of the corridor to Boyce-Gyro Beach Park is planned for the year 2030 or later, pending budget availability.


Proposed quick-build infrastructure strategy

To extend the Abbott ATC sooner than 2030, until the permanent facility can be built, we're piloting the use of quick-build infrastructure.

Quick-build strategies combine interim materials within existing street space, with limited new construction, to deliver projects faster and at a lower cost.


Next steps

Public input will inform the design of both the proposed quick-build Abbott ATC and the potential future use of quick-build infrastructure for other active transportation projects in Kelowna.

Detailed design in 2021 will consider public feedback, with construction planned for early 2022 pending Council approval of additional budget.

How to participate & stay informed

The online survey open from May 19 to June 6, 2021, has now closed. Thank you to the more than 1,000 people who shared their feedback.

Ask a question in the Q&A section

Sign up for Public Transit, Walking & Biking email updates


Project background

Abbott Street is one of Kelowna's busiest bicycling and pedestrian routes.

We're planning upgrades to create a safer and more comfortable bicycling route for people of all ages and abilities.

The existing Abbott Street Active Transportation Corridor (ATC) was designed and constructed in 2012.

Permanent construction of the rest of the corridor to Boyce-Gyro Beach Park is planned for the year 2030 or later, pending budget availability.


Proposed quick-build infrastructure strategy

To extend the Abbott ATC sooner than 2030, until the permanent facility can be built, we're piloting the use of quick-build infrastructure.

Quick-build strategies combine interim materials within existing street space, with limited new construction, to deliver projects faster and at a lower cost.


Next steps

Public input will inform the design of both the proposed quick-build Abbott ATC and the potential future use of quick-build infrastructure for other active transportation projects in Kelowna.

Detailed design in 2021 will consider public feedback, with construction planned for early 2022 pending Council approval of additional budget.

  • Preliminary design details

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    The two-way protected bike lane will extend the Abbott Active Transportation Corridor (ATC) from Rose Avenue near the hospital to Boyce-Gyro Beach Park. Interim materials will be installed starting in 2022, pending budget approvals, and replaced in the future with permanent infrastructure.

    Benefits

    • Provides separation between pedestrians, bicyclists and vehicles.
    • Fits within the existing street space.
    • Provides a protected bicycling facility sooner than currently scheduled in the 10-Year Capital Plan.
    • Adds new crosswalks, sidewalks, stop signs and traffic calming at key locations.
    • Two-way vehicle traffic flow maintained.

    Trade-offs

    • To accommodate the active transportation corridor and maintain two-way vehicle traffic, on-street parking in some areas will be changed or removed due to insufficient road width.

    Preliminary design

    Two-way protected bike lanes, with a multi-use path in some sections that have space constraints, are proposed for the west side of Abbot Street between Rose Avenue and Boyce-Gyro Beach Park.

    The type of barrier used between the bike lanes/pathway and the vehicle lane will be informed by public input.

    Preliminary design by section

    Having trouble viewing the below images? A PDF version of the Preliminary Design information is available under the 'Documents' section of the main project page.


    Rose Avenue to Christleton Avenue

    Proposed design:

    • New protected multi-use path on the west side of Abbott Street
    • New crosswalks
    • New sidewalks

    Christleton Avenue to Wardlaw Avenue

    Proposed design:

    • New two-way protected bike lane on the west side of Abbott Street

    Wardlaw Avenue to West Avenue

    Proposed design:

    • New two-way protected bike lane on the west side of Abbott STreet
    • New crosswalk at Wardlaw Avenue
    • Angle parking converted to parallel parking at Kinsmen Park

    West Avenue to Cedar Avenue

    Proposed design:

    • New two-way protected bike lane on the west side of Abbott Street

    Cedar Avenue to Walnut Street

    Proposed design:

    • New two-way protected bike lane on the west side of Meikle Avenue
    • New 4-way stop at Walnut Street
    • New stop sign at Meikle Avenue
    • New crosswalk on Meikle Avenue at Walnut Street
    • New traffic calming curbs

    Walnut Street & Watt Road

    Proposed design:

    • New two-way protected bike lane on the west side of Walnut Street and Watt Road
    • Three new stop signs at Walnut Street and Watt Road
    • New sidewalk in one section


    Having trouble viewing these images? A PDF version of the Preliminary Design information is available under the 'Documents' section of the main project page

  • Parking impacts

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    Our Parking Management Strategy aims to support a balanced transportation network. To build bike lanes or multi-use paths, sometimes we have to reallocate public street space that has historically been used for private vehicle parking.

    To accommodate the Abbott Street Active Transportation Corridor extension and maintain two-way vehicle traffic flow, on-street parking in some areas will be changed or converted to walking and bicycling space.

    A parking study has assessed parking demand in this area and informed the project design. We anticipate that parking demand can generally be met on the east side of Abbott Street and nearby cross streets.

    Parking impacts by section

    Rose Avenue to Wardlaw Avenue



    Wardlaw Avenue to West Avenue


    West Avenue to Cedar Avenue


    Cedar Avenue to Walnut Avenue


    Walnut Avenue to Boyce-Gyro Beach Park

  • News release: Gear up to share feedback on new Abbott corridor design

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    With more than 250 thousand people walking and biking the Abbott Street active transportation corridor last year, the City is exploring the use of ‘quick-build’ infrastructure to extend the route between Rose Avenue and Boyce-Gyro Beach Park. Residents and the public are invited to comment on the proposed design at getinvolved.kelowna.ca.

    “Quick-build strategies combine interim materials on existing street space, with limited new construction, to deliver projects sooner and at a lower cost than originally scheduled in our 10-Year Capital Plan,” said Chad Williams, Senior Transportation Planning Engineer. “Extending the Abbott ATC will link the Downtown and Pandosy areas, improving access to parks, beaches and amenities along the way.”

    Proposed improvements include a two-way protected bicycling lane, with a multi-use path in sections that have space constraints. Results of the pilot will inform design of future improvements both along Abbott Street and other projects across the city.

    Abbott Street is one of Kelowna’s busiest bicycling and pedestrian routes, and 2020 saw an increase in use of more than 50 per cent compared to the previous year. Quick-build infrastructure strategies have become popular with cities in North America, and the City recognizes the importance of accelerating improvements to create safe and comfortable biking facilities for people of all ages and abilities.

    Construction is anticipated to start in 2022, pending budget approval. An online feedback survey is open from May 19 to June 6, 2021. Public input will help inform the final project design and other potential quick-build active transportation projects in Kelowna. Project information and the survey are available online at getinvolved.kelowa.ca