North End Neighbourhood Plan

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Help shape the future of the North End!

This area is quickly evolving – home to a mix of residential, recreational, industrial and commercial uses, and a trendy brewery district, it’s rich with amenities that draw visitors near and far.

The North End Neighbourhood Plan will guide redevelopment in the area over the next 20 years and beyond. The detailed strategy will include locations of parks and public spaces, development standards, and transportation solutions.

How to get involved

Mark the map
Put your mark on a map of the North End and let the City know what you like about the neighbourhood today, and what you would like to see in the future.

Stay tuned: there will be many more engagement opportunities to come over the course of this project. To learn more about upcoming engagement opportunities and receive the latest project info, follow this page!

Background

The North End is being prioritized for a neighbourhood plan because the pace of change and the imminent development of the former Tolko mill site will require us to plan this area proactively and holistically – in a way that ensures any new development aligns with our Imagine Kelowna community vision and incorporates residents' aspirations for this unique part of town.

Following the City's lead, the Mill Site development team will also be engaging with the public for input on the future of this key waterfront location. To learn about the Mill Site development team's planning process, visit: kelownamillsite.ca

Help shape the future of the North End!

This area is quickly evolving – home to a mix of residential, recreational, industrial and commercial uses, and a trendy brewery district, it’s rich with amenities that draw visitors near and far.

The North End Neighbourhood Plan will guide redevelopment in the area over the next 20 years and beyond. The detailed strategy will include locations of parks and public spaces, development standards, and transportation solutions.

How to get involved

Mark the map
Put your mark on a map of the North End and let the City know what you like about the neighbourhood today, and what you would like to see in the future.

Stay tuned: there will be many more engagement opportunities to come over the course of this project. To learn more about upcoming engagement opportunities and receive the latest project info, follow this page!

Background

The North End is being prioritized for a neighbourhood plan because the pace of change and the imminent development of the former Tolko mill site will require us to plan this area proactively and holistically – in a way that ensures any new development aligns with our Imagine Kelowna community vision and incorporates residents' aspirations for this unique part of town.

Following the City's lead, the Mill Site development team will also be engaging with the public for input on the future of this key waterfront location. To learn about the Mill Site development team's planning process, visit: kelownamillsite.ca

Questions

Have a question? Ask us here. 

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    As long time residents of Poplar Point we have experienced the congestion on PP drive with increased walkers, bikers and of course traffic. We have a narrow roadway with some blind corners and very little parking , creating an unsafe roadway. I would like to know the city’s plan for this road which directly links to the Northend plan. I’d also want to know why Poplar point isn’t included in the North End Plan.

    Murray asked about 2 months ago

    Hello,

    Thank you for your interest in the North End Plan, and Poplar Point in particular. We acknowledge your concerns regarding Poplar Point Dr. The City does not have any specific plans for this road at this time.

    As for why Poplar Point was not included within the North End Plan, the main reason for this is that the City is not willing to entertain any change to this area, as it is situated within a very sensitive environmental area--between Okanagan Lake and Knox Mountain Park and on a steep slope. That said, we recognize that residents of Poplar Point may well be affected by the North End Plan as the area is accessible only through the North End. For this reason, we welcome input from residents of the area through the planning process. Please stay tuned to the Get Involved webpage for opportunities to make you voice heard.

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    With all of the development both in downtown and the north end, and the city's hope to move people out of their cars and densify with more options for walking/biking - there needs to be at least one (ideally two or three) grocery stores put in this area!! Where are all the new residents of these high rises supposed to get their grocery needs? The closest one is the downtown Safeway which is small and far from the north end - is this being considered??

    Laura S33 asked 2 months ago

    Hello, 

    Thank you for you comment regarding the need for a grocery store in the North End. This is something we've heard from many local residents. I've answered a similar question in the past, so I'll repeat that answer here:

    The City certainly would like to have every resident be able to meet all their daily needs within close walking distance of their homes—and a grocery store is definitely a big part of this. One thing the City can do to help ensure this is the case is to make sure zoning is in place that allows shops (including grocery stores) within walking distance of homes—and this will be a consideration in the case of the North End Plan. However, it is important to note that the City does not have complete control over what shops and services locate where. Local shops and services depend on a certain base population density in order to support them. Again, the City can help by ensuring that enough density is permitted in zoning to support local shops and services, and this will also be a consideration in the case of the North End Plan. But these shops and services must ultimately commit to buying into a community in order for this to occur.

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    Not an easy topic that I expect an answer to on a board like this, but a growing list of cities (including Edmonton) have eliminated parking minimums, at least in their downtowns, to create space for more valuable use, help create affordable housing by unbundling parking, and reduce car dependency. Can the city consider eliminating their minimums at the same time, at least in the area, before the North End sees too much redevelopment?

    NathanH asked 5 months ago

    Hello,

    Thank you for your comment. With regards to parking requirements: The City of Kelowna’s parking requirements are tied to zoning. The City recently (in 2019) reviewed its parking requirements in the Zoning Bylaw and did reduce these parking minimums in many cases—especially under mixed-use zones found in the downtown and other urban centres where transit service is best and daily needs are close-by and easy to reach through either walking or biking. The Report to Council on the project is available here: Section 8 Parking & Loading Zoning Bylaw Text Amendment Application (escribemeetings.com). It is true that several cities in North America have now eliminated parking minimums in some circumstances. Researcher and professor Donald Shoup is a prominent figure in support of such measures. However, the City of Kelowna has, until now, proved to be unprepared to take such a step.  

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    Will there be a grocery store & a pharmacy in the North end. I think that is vital.

    Debra Pender asked 5 months ago

    Hello,

    Thank you for your comment regarding the need for a grocery store and pharmacy in the North End. The City certainly would like to have every resident be able to meet all their daily needs within close walking distance of their homes—and a grocery store and pharmacy are definitely a big part of this. One thing the City can do to help ensure this is the case is to make sure zoning is in place that allows shops within walking distance of homes—and this will be a consideration in the case of the North End Plan. However, it is important to note that the City does not have complete control over what shops and services locate where. Local shops and services depend on a certain base population density in order to support them. Again, the City can help by ensuring that enough density is permitted in zoning to support local shops and services, and this will also be a consideration in the case of the North End Plan. But these shops and services must ultimately commit to buying into a community in order for this to occur.

Page last updated: 14 January 2022, 16:10