Bikeshare Pilot

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Consultation has concluded

Tell us where you would like to see a Dropbike haven

The Kelowna Bikeshare Pilot is a 18-month agreement with Dropbike to deliver 500-1500 bikes in a bikeshare system within the City of Kelowna on a pilot basis. Bikeshare is a system of bikes located at different points in a city that can be used for one-way trips. Pick up a bike somewhere and drop it off near your final destination.

How havens work

Bikeshare havens will form the backbone of the bikeshare network.

Bikeshare havens are locations where users can end their trips without incurring an additional fee benefiting from lower pricing.

As we design the backbone of the bikeshare network we would like to learn more about where you would use a bikeshare service.

  • What neighbourhoods we should cover first?
  • Where do residents want to see bikeshare?

Users that end their trip outside of a haven are charged a penalty fee which is converted to bounty on the bike. Users can return the bike to a haven to earn the bounty as a credit on their account.

What do havens look like?

Havens will be simple areas in the city that are marked and highlighted within the dropbike app. No large installation will be required to create havens and havens can be created on demand for things like special events.

The pilot will last 18 months, start in Spring 2018, and operate at no cost to the municipality.

Residents were invited to pin their bike havens until April 30. Thank you to everyone who pinned their bikeshare havens!

We will be sharing the haven location data with Drop Bike. You can look forward to seeing bikes on the streets coming in May 2018!

Tell us where you would like to see a Dropbike haven

The Kelowna Bikeshare Pilot is a 18-month agreement with Dropbike to deliver 500-1500 bikes in a bikeshare system within the City of Kelowna on a pilot basis. Bikeshare is a system of bikes located at different points in a city that can be used for one-way trips. Pick up a bike somewhere and drop it off near your final destination.

How havens work

Bikeshare havens will form the backbone of the bikeshare network.

Bikeshare havens are locations where users can end their trips without incurring an additional fee benefiting from lower pricing.

As we design the backbone of the bikeshare network we would like to learn more about where you would use a bikeshare service.

  • What neighbourhoods we should cover first?
  • Where do residents want to see bikeshare?

Users that end their trip outside of a haven are charged a penalty fee which is converted to bounty on the bike. Users can return the bike to a haven to earn the bounty as a credit on their account.

What do havens look like?

Havens will be simple areas in the city that are marked and highlighted within the dropbike app. No large installation will be required to create havens and havens can be created on demand for things like special events.

The pilot will last 18 months, start in Spring 2018, and operate at no cost to the municipality.

Residents were invited to pin their bike havens until April 30. Thank you to everyone who pinned their bikeshare havens!

We will be sharing the haven location data with Drop Bike. You can look forward to seeing bikes on the streets coming in May 2018!

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    How do I find where the Havens in Kelowna are?

    Linda asked about 2 years ago

    To see the location of all the bikes in the bikeshare system download the Dropbike app from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

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    When will this be introduced?

    Daren asked about 2 years ago

    Within the next week or so.

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    How about a place where there are 6 condominiums in the area, Like 1101 Cameron Ave.?

    ballgamer asked about 2 years ago

    Sounds like a great location. Thanks for your suggestion.

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    Why is it that a person is required to have a 300 dollar smart phone to use this? I kind of think that is discrimination to those who can not afford a smart phone

    marie bergman asked over 2 years ago

    There are many ways to look at accessibility when it comes to bikeshare. Accessibility for the customer and what they need to access the service, access geographically (does bikeshare serve only higher income neighbourhoods?), and is bikeshare out of reach for many people in terms of the cost and also credit needed to access it.

    In many Canadian bikeshare systems, users need a $400 preauthorization on their credit card to use the system. Access to credit can be a major barrier to access. In Kelowna, bikeshare users will need a credit or a credit debit card and the deposit is simply 50$.  

    In most bikeshare systems in Canada smartphones are not required. In Kelowna smartphones are required to access the system. Before settling on a technology that required a smartphone staff looked at how many low-income residents have cell service in our community from StatsCan. We found, in BC, low-income households are more likely than higher income households to have cell service. Whether that service includes data/internet service is yet to be determined. To mitigate the need for internet staff is open to exploring the ability to unlock a bike by call-in number or by text throughout the pilot. If this is successful it could eliminate the need for internet service and lower the requirement from smartphone to cell phone.

    Geographic accessibility hasn’t been heavily discussed in bikeshare as much as the top 2. Bikeshare, because of its historically high upfront cost, has, in Canada, been relegated to only serving the very densest areas of cities. These areas also have things like rapid transit and good coverage of various mobility services. Bikeshare only existing in the densest communities lose the potential to serve further flung communities that have gaps in their transit network and a lack of options for how to get around. With the low-cost technology that Kelowna will be piloting, we will be able to deploy bikeshare in more neighborhoods than typical for a mid-size city at no cost to the municipality.

    Through Kelowna’s bikeshare pilot we will be experimenting with the service to find out how it can be accessible to the broadest spectrum of our population. Thank you for your question and your concern for low-income members of our community.

    EDIT

    We have worked with the operator to deliver a "text-to-unlock" function so users don't necessarily need a smart phone or even a data plan. Thanks for your question.


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    Does it mean I have to bring my own helmet? That’s very inconvenient. Vancouver bikes have helmet attached. Are we painting our roads orange for the haven?i heard they did it in Kingston. My friend said it’s terrible. They left a mark on the ground and the street looks messy

    DC asked over 2 years ago

    Yes, users have to bring a helmet with them. 

    Through staff’s evaluation of the safety impact of bikeshare in other jurisdictions and through stakeholder engagement the question of how we design this service to comply with the mandatory helmet law and the safety of riders was considered. 

    Each additional person on a bike wearing a helmet has a safety benefit. Yet there are additional factors other than helmet use that impact the safety of each person on a bike in Kelowna. 

    To assess the safety of bikeshare we looked at per kilometer injury statistics for personal bikes and bikeshare bikes, while also comparing cities with bikeshare to those without. This helped staff determine both the marginal benefit or detriment of one trip on bikeshare and also understand the city-wide safety impacts of having a bikeshare system. When comparing the risk of riding bikeshare to personal bikes on a per kilometer basis we have found bikeshare trips have a lower injury rates than for personal bicycles. Experts attribute this lower injury rate to various factors including the low speed, the presence of lights, and the low center of gravity of most bikeshare bikes and that bikeshare is ridden in places where drivers expect to see people on bikes. When comparing cities with bikeshare to those without studies have found positive safety impacts from bikeshare being available in a city compared to control cities without bikeshare. Both general injury rates and head injury rates fall across the entire cycling population when bikeshare is introduced. Staff expect a bikeshare system to bring a positive impact for bike safety in Kelowna. 

    Through a pilot program for the city we considered delivering shared helmets. Through further analysis, we have decided not to pursue this course of action for two reasons, safety and hygiene. 

    SAFETY 

    Helmets are designed such that their effectiveness is greatly reduced after a primary impact. It would be extraordinarily burdensome to continuously test and guarantee the safety benefits behind a helmet fleet that could climb to more than 1000 helmets over the course of the pilot. From a safety perspective there would be no guarantee that a previous rider hadn't damaged the helmet that would accompany your bike. If a rider was injured while wearing a helmet that had experienced prior impact, there is a potential for this risk to be borne by the bikeshare provider and the City because of the lack of safety precautions and system-wide helmet tests. 

    HYGIENE 

    The vast majority of bikeshare systems don’t provide helmets with bicycles. Still there are jurisdictions, where bike helmets are shared on bikeshare. These systems exist mainly where mandatory all ages bike helmet laws are in effect and where the municipality pays the upfront capital cost for the system. The most notable examples of this are, Seattle’s, now defunct, Pronto service, Mobi in Vancouver and Melbourne Bikeshare in Australia. Staff have not found a measurable difference in terms of helmet use per rider when comparing systems that offer helmets vs jurisdictions that do not offer helmets and expect riders to bring a helmet with them. Bikeshare has a historically lower rate of helmet use than personal bikes. We expect the mandatory helmet law in BC to bump up helmet use in Kelowna’s bikeshare system compared against jurisdictions without an all ages helmet law. Outside of shared helmets, there are certain things staff will do that could grow the proportion of riders wearing helmets while on bikeshare. Staff will ensure information about the helmet law and discounts on helmets are available through the provider’s app or other point of sale application by partnering with local bike helmet retailers who want to participate.

    Haven markings with be temporary and easily removable. We haven't decided what color they will be at this point.

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    How comfortable are we the bikes to ride? How many speed? Are they safe?

    DC asked over 2 years ago

    The bikes are comfortable and safe with three speeds to choose from. All bikes have front and rear lights, a front basket and a bell. The seat post is adjustable so the bike fits a wide variety of user heights. A photo of the bike can be found here: https://www.kelowna.ca/roads-transportation/active-transportation/cycling/bikeshare-pilot

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    Will there be an emergency collection phone number available to get abandoned bikes cleared from disabled access areas like ramps, parking, narrow sidewalks, bus stops and so on? People who use wheelchairs and walkers are not able to just go around obstructions and waiting a full day or more to have them cleared is unacceptable. In other cities with these programs disabled people end up with much, much worse access than they had before, which is never great to start with. We have enough trouble dealing with broken sidewalks, no sidewalks, lack of curb cuts, people not shoveling or clearing leaves, signs, patio tables & chairs, trash cans, vehicles parked over sidewalks etc etc etc without having abandoned bikes adding to the obstacles.

    Cangal asked over 2 years ago

    Dropbike will have a support phone number where you can reach them and are required to remove bikes blocking vital access to ramps, parking, sidewalks, and bus stops in a timely manner. The support number will be on each bike and be clearly visible.


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    Who is on the hook if this folly doesn’t generate enough revenue .? Maybe the people who started this idea ?

    Joe asked over 2 years ago

    Dropbike, a private for-profit company based in Toronto, operates the bikeshare system and takes on all financial risk if the system fails to generate enough revenue.

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    Hi, I do not have a question per say, but I have a suggestion. I think the bike share is an excellent idea and will benefit the residents and visitors in Kelowna. My suggestion is to have the company installing the bike share locations prominently display a sign that has some basic BC laws with regards to bicycling. Especially riding bicycles on a sidewalk. This is the most common offense now along with riding with no helmet. Once dozens of bicycles are being used there will be increased incidents with bicycles and vehicles and bicycles and pedestrians, Let's try and educate bicycle users and prevent incidents from occurring. Bylaw officers and police will be busier attempting to curb offenders and responding to incidents. Rights and duties of an operator of a cycle 183 (1) In addition to the duties imposed by this section, a person operating a cycle on a highway has the same rights and duties as a driver of a vehicle. (2) A person operating a cycle (a) must not ride on a sidewalk unless authorized by a bylaw made under section 124 or unless otherwise directed by a sign, (b) must not, for the purpose of crossing a highway, ride on a crosswalk unless authorized to do so by a bylaw made under section 124 or unless otherwise directed by a sign, (c) must, subject to paragraph (a), ride as near as practicable to the right side of the highway, (d) must not ride abreast of another person operating a cycle on the roadway, (e) must keep at least one hand on the handlebars, (f) must not ride other than on or astride a regular seat of the cycle, (g) must not use the cycle to carry more persons at one time than the number for which it is designed and equipped, and (h) must not ride a cycle on a highway where signs prohibit their use.

    Tony asked over 2 years ago

    Dropbike the bikeshare operator for Kelowna, is mandated by the City of Kelowna to provide information about local rules of the road including the BC mandatory helmet law in their mobile application and on every bike. Thank you for your suggestion

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    I just returned from a week in Scottsdale Arizona where such a project is in place. There are literally several hundred of them almost on every street corner. Two competing companies. I was appalled by the large numbers that were abandoned and scattered everywhere on the streets. If the local plan is to gather them up every night l would support it. If not they will be an eyesore as they are in Scottsdale..

    Gord Schaeffer asked over 2 years ago

    Dropbike, the bikeshare operator for Kelowna, will not be collecting all the bikeshare bikes up every night.

    It is important that Kelowna residents feel as though Bikeshare provides an orderly and an attractive addition to their community. Staff will be managing this by using bikeshare havens.Bikeshare havens are locations where bikeshare users can end their trips without incurring an additional fee. Bikeshare users that end their trip outside of a haven are charged a penalty fee. This fee is converted to a bounty on the bike allowing users to return the bike to a haven to earn a credit on their account. This economic incentive helps maintain order in the bikeshare system. 

    Additionally, Dropbike is mandated to remove bikes that block access to sidewalks, crosswalks and other elements of the right of way on a daily basis. 


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    I recently visited Dallas, Texas where a similar scheme operates, but what concerned me was that bikes were dropped all over the place causing a danger to pedestrians and an eyesore to the city. Also many were vandalised or stolen. How can you guarantee we won't suffer the same street debris in Kelowna?

    cbanfield asked over 2 years ago

    Dallas has over 20,000 dockless bikeshare bikes from multiple operators within their municipal borders. I have not been to Dallas during their pilot but I have read about it. Kelowna’s pilot while using the same technology is organizing our Bikeshare pilot differently.

    It is important that Kelowna residents feel as though Bikeshare provides an orderly and an attractive addition to their community. Staff will be managing this by using bikeshare havens.Bikeshare havens are locations where bikeshare users can end their trips without incurring an additional fee. Bikeshare users that end their trip outside of a haven are charged a penalty fee. This fee is converted to a bounty on the bike allowing users to return the bike to a haven to earn a credit on their account. This economic incentive helps maintain order in the Bikeshare system.

    The City of Kelowna will only have a single company operating here and their fleet is capped at 1500 bikes without further permission from the City.

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    How is the program going to work for collecting discarded bikes. They will be cluttering up the streets, alleys, sidewalks and beach fronts. There is enough garbage and random stuff left around town. To add to unattended carts, blankets, drug detritus, and prone bodies we will now see dozens of abandoned bikes. Another horrible eyesore for this decaying, once beautiful city.

    Concerned asked over 2 years ago

    It is important that Kelowna residents feel as though Bikeshare provides an orderly and an attractive addition to their community. Staff will be managing this by using bikeshare havens. Bikeshare havens are locations where bikeshare users can end their trips without incurring an additional fee. Bikeshare users that end their trip outside of a haven are charged a penalty fee. This fee is converted to a bounty on the bike allowing users to return the bike to a haven to earn a credit on their account. This economic incentive helps maintain order in the bikeshare system.

    Additionally Dropbike, the bikeshare operator for Kelowna, is mandated to remove bikes that block access to sidewalks, crosswalks and other elements of the right of way on a daily basis. 

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    Are people that call it "bike sharing" and "ride sharing" too stupid to be on city council? That is a valid question. It isn't sharing if you have to pay for it. Corporations have co-opted "friend", "like", and now "share". But it is only words, I hear you say. But remember, those that control the words, control the narrative. You have been truly fooled. PS. Not going to fly because tourists don't bring along their bike helmets when they go on holidays. Ah, I see, you are going to revoke the bike helmet laws for a company. Profits before safety!

    Grumpy asked over 2 years ago

    Bike helmets are still required when riding Bikeshare or any other bike in BC for that matter. Vancouver, Victoria, Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa, and Hamilton all have costs for end users associated with use of their bikeshare systems.


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    I do not have a specific question but rather a great big YES for feedback. Our community will only benefit from a program that reduces the cars on the road!!

    lisaarianne asked over 2 years ago

    Thanks Lisa!